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Monthly Archives: May 2013

UCL’s Documentary Film Festival

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UCL hosts the third edition of Open City Docs Fest in venues across campus and beyond, June 20-23.
This is London’s only documentary festival – a gift from UCL to our global city.

Bringing together some of the best filmmakers in the world and the researchers upon whom their films so often rely, the festival creates conversations in and around film.

The festival will screen over 90 films. The best will be judged by a jury chaired by actor turned documentarist, Jeremy Irons. He is joined by our own departing Provost, Malcolm Grant, and others from the world of film and academia.

Open City aims to be much more than a film festival. UCL academics introduce the films, provide screen notes for the audiences, chair post-screening discussions, and participate in numerous panel events. This year panels range from the future of copyright in the age of the internet to the challenges and rewards of studies that run across the life course, from 7UP to Birth Cohort studies.

You can visit our website for details of all events and booking arrangements

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Frieze

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Issue 156: The Fiction Issue

For this special Fiction Issue of frieze, nine writers and artists consider how narrative will change as technology advances. Featuring: Fatima Al Qadiri, James Bridle, Ian ChengOrit Gat, Lev Manovich, Christiane Paul, Alexander ProvanTimotheus Vermeulen and Holly Willis. 

Plus, Katie Kitamura looks at how art can visualize political realities through the artifice of fiction; Laura Pawson asks whether it’s an artist’s duty to bear witness to suffering; and Ben Lerner reflects on whether objects are more real than words.

More highlights include: Dan Fox talks to artist David Levine; Questionnaire with Dayanita Singh;Rajeev Balasubramanyam on national identity and ‘global fiction’; film director Pablo Larraindiscusses the merging of fact and fiction with Rob White; and an extract from Lynne Tillman’s novel-in progress ‘Men and Apparitions’.

In our regular columns: Tom Morton considers the changing face of graduate exhibitions; Kaelen Wilson-Goldie looks at prisoners of conscious and creative acts; and Jason Farago signs up to De Appel’s new course in art dealing.

Also: 37 reviews from 29 cities in 17 countries, including: ‘Umhlaba 1913-2013’, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town; and ‘Sharjah Biennial 11’, various venues, UAE.

Read More | Subscribe Now

Frieze 1 Montclare Street, London E2 7EU, UK, | Tel: +44 (0) 20 3372 6111
Email: info@frieze.com | www.frieze.com

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Academic Support Workshop Sessions

Year 2 Graphic Design Communication dissertation students.

Academic support at CCW/UAL have very kindly offered you a series of workshops to help you design your dissertation ‘research strategy’ and to help you with your presentations next week.

They will all be in room A336 and be run by Victoria Ahrens. Please contact her if you cannot attend any of these sessions at: v.ahrens@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

These works will be invaluable and you should attend and will be a great help to your dissertation preparation. If you cannot attend the session you have been allocated to then go on one of the others.
Thursday 30th May 10.00-12.00: Groups  A + B + C  room A336

Friday      31st May 10.00-11:30: Groups  E + D  room A336

Friday      31st May 12:00-13:30: Groups  F + G   room A336

AND

Friday   31st May 2:00- 3:30   room A336

For any who cannot make it to the previous sessions
The workshops are inclusive and open to all students.

They will cover your thesis proposals, what to include in them and how to present them, as well as how to construct a research strategy to follow on from your initial briefing session.

Please contact her if you cannot attend any of these sessions at: v.ahrens@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

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Picturing Propaganda: A Study Day

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When: Sat 1 Jun 2013, 10.00-16.30

Where: Conference Centre, British Library

Price: £25 / £15 concessions

Book now for 01 Jun 2013, 10.00-16.30

Effective propaganda relies as much on images as it does on words. This study day will explore the role of visual communication in influencing ideas and changing behaviour. Academics and curators will discuss the history of visual propaganda, using fascinating (and sometimes funny) examples from the British Library and British Film Institute collections. The event is aimed at students, researchers and anyone with an interest in 20th century history, design, film or communication studies. Entry to the exhibition is included in the price.

The morning session will give a brief history of visual propaganda, discussing film, posters, leaflets, maps, stamps and more. The afternoon session will focus on three themes that dominate 20th century propaganda: nation-building, health and war. Our speakers will explore the different ways that these themes have been dealt with in the last century, comparing the methods of propaganda and the public response.

In collaboration with the BFI

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QUORUM

Quorum, 29 May, Dave Beech

We warmly invite you to join us for QUORUM on Wednesday 29 May.

Dave Beech, Chelsea College of Art, will present his paper entitled

‘Spreading The Cost Disease: Handicraft and Art’s Economic Exceptionalism’.

Where: Rehearsal Room 1, Arts One, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Campus

When: 5:15 Wednesday 29 May

Abstract:

I will be developing the ideas of Baumol and Bowen, whose 1966 book ‘Performing Arts: The Economic Dilemma’ introduced the idea of the ‘cost disease’. This argument has been expanded recently by Baumol in his book on the cost disease of health and education. I will be asking whether the cost disease is an example of art’s ‘economic exceptionalism’.

Bio:

Dave Beech is an artist in the collective Freee. The group exhibited at the Liverpool biennial in 2010 and has been selected for the Istanbul biennial in 2013, as well as exhibiting at BAK as part of the Former West project, Vittoria, Smart Project Space and Culturegest. He co-curated the exhibition ‘We Are Grammar’ at Pratt Institute, NY and edited the book ‘Beauty’ for Whitechapel/MIT. He teaches at Chelsea College of Art and is currently writing a book on art and economics for the Historical Materialism Book Series.

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2013 HANNAH ARENDT PRIZE

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Photograph of Hannah Arendt, NYC, 1944. Courtesy of the Estate of Fred Stein (fredstein.com)

THE HANNAH ARENDT PRIZE IN CRITICAL THEORY AND CREATIVE RESEARCH: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Original Writing on Critical Theory and Creative Research

Award presented by the MA in Critical Theory and Creative Research Program
Entry submission: essay of 1,500 words or less

Application deadline: Friday, May 31, 2013

Theme: On Art and Disobedience; Or, What Is an Intervention?

Cash award: 5,000 USD

Winner announced by Saturday, August 31, 2013

Please note that essays over the limit will be disqualified.

The Hannah Arendt Prize in Critical Theory and Creative Research is an annual competition for those interested in the juncture of art and creative research and in the principles at the heart of the arts and humanities, including sense-based intelligence; the reality of singular, nonrepeatable phenomena; ethical vision; and consilience between inner and outer, nature and reason, thought and experience, subject and object, self and world.

Application for the prize is open to the general public. Download the PDF application and email the completed application and the essay (in a .doc or .pdf format) to ctcrprize@pnca.edu.

Explication of theme:

“To disobey in order to take action is the byword of all creative spirits. The history of human progress amounts to a series of Promethean acts. But autonomy is also attained in the daily workings of individual lives by means of many small Promethean disobediences, at once clever, well thought out, and patiently pursued, so subtle at times as to avoid punishment entirely. All that remains in such a case is an equivocal, diluted form of guilt. I would say that there is good reason to study the dynamics of disobedience, the spark behind all knowledge.”

Gaston Bachelard, Fragments of a Poetics of Fire

Intervention is an omnipresent if not ubiquitous word in contemporary discourse, but what forms does it take in the age of genetic engineering and real-time media? Is the concept a decoy or distraction in the face of futility? A cover or compensation for hopeless battles and set-ups? Is it simply working to slow down the Inevitable, a notion that in and of itself works as a major obstacle to critical thought and action? Or is it something more serious, more durable, and more dangerous? What is the relation of critique and intervention, theory and practice? And what role does art play in what Bachelard called “creative disobedience,” acts of Prometheanism “so subtle at times as to avoid punishment entirely”? Might art now comprise one of the last forms of political stealth, working in increasingly sophisticated time-based ways? What kinds of thought and action are powerful and compelling interventions today, whether one-off spectacles, sabots, monkey wrenches, sleepers, gummy bears, or Trojan Horses?

Along with Anne-Marie Oliver and Barry Sanders, Founding Co-Chairs, MA in Critical Theory and Creative Research, Pacific Northwest College of Art, the judges for 2013 include

Claire Bishop, Professor of Contemporary Art, Theory and Exhibition History, Graduate Center, The City University of New York

Judith Butler, Professor of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, The University of California, Berkeley, and Hannah Arendt Professor of Philosophy, Europäische Universität für Interdisziplinäre Studien/EGS

Barbara Duden, Professor Emerita, Leibniz Universität Hannover

Julia Kristeva, Professor Emerita and Head of the École doctorale Langues, Littératures, Images, Université Paris Diderot, Paris 7, and recipient of the Hannah Arendt Award for Political Thought

Heike Kühn, Film Critic
Martha Rosler, Artist and contributor to the Hannah Arendt Denkraum (on the occasion of Hannah Arendt’s 100th birthday)

For information about last year’s competition, please see

http://www.artandeducation.net/announcement/the-hannah-arendt-prize-call-for-entries

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THE TURING NORMALIZING MACHINE

by Yonatan Ben-Simhon and Mushon Zer-Aviv

An experiment in machine learning & algorithmic prejudice

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From: http://mushon.com/tnm/

In the 1930s British Mathematician Alan Turing studied normal numbers. During World War 2 he cracked the Nazi Enigma code, and then laid the foundations for computing and artificial intelligence. In the 1950s he was convicted of homosexuality and was chemically castrated. And in June 7th 1954, depressed by the anti-homosexuality medical treatment, and alienated by the society who deemed him abnormal, Alan Turing ate a cyanide laced apple.

In the following decades many of Turing’s ideas have materialized through the digital revolution, while many of them are still being researched. Inspired by Turing’s life and research we seek to finally crack the greatest enigma of all:

“Who is normal?”

The Turing Normalizing Machine is an experimental research in machine-learning that identifies and analyzes the concept of social normalcy. Each participant is presented with a video line up of 4 previously recorded participants and is asked to point out the most normal-looking of the 4. The person selected is examined by the machine and is added to its algorithmically constructed image of normalcy. The kind participant’s video is then added as a new entry on the database.

As the database grows the Turing Normalizing Machine develops a more intricate model of normal-appearance, and moves us closer to our research goal: to once-and-for-all decode the mystery of what society deems “normal” and to automate the process for the advancement of science, commerce, security and society at large.

The abnormal,
while logically second,
is existentially first.

Georges Canguilhem, The Normal and the Pathological, 1966.

Conducted and presented as a scientific experiment TNM challenges the participants to consider the outrageous proposition of algorithmic prejudice. The responses range from fear and outrage to laughter and ridicule, and finally to the alarming realization that we are set on a path towards wide systemic prejudice ironically initiated by its victim, Turing.

by Yonatan Ben-Simhon and Mushon Zer-Aviv. [contact]

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