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Briefs

Unit 10 Dissertation + Project Blog 40 Credits 

This unit provides an opportunity for you to engage in a subject area which interests you. Whilst the focus of the topic may be design-led it is recognised that a far wider cultural remit in terms of subject matter can often be more rewarding for you and help you to critically engage with your own practice. In addition, you will put together a Project Blog, through which you will contextualise your progress towards your Final Project and your engagement with contemporary design practice.

5.10 Unit 10 Dissertation and Project Blog Level  Level 6 FHEQ
Location within Course  Weeks 1 – 30
Credit Rating  40 Credits
Indicative Learning Hours  400 hours
Notional Contact Hours  40 hours
Access to Supervised Facilities  160 hours
Independent Study  200 hours

Introduction 

This unit will count towards 33.3% of your final mark. It will constitute the summation of previous units in that you will be asked to submit a dissertation of between six to eight thousand words. The topic, which will have previously been agreed by your supervisor, will explore an area considered relevant to your own personal interests and the discipline of Design Communication. It is expected that you will bring to bear the accumulated knowledge and experience of the previous two years works and assessment.

Indicative Content 

The focus of this unit is your exploration of your chosen dissertation subject area. In addition you put together a Project Blog that contextualises your practice.

Personal and Professional Development 

• Evidence efficient, specific personal learning strategies.

• Demonstrate competence in communication skills.

• Evidence capacity for ongoing learning, planning and professional development.

Learning and Teaching Methods 

This unit is wholly managed through a tutorial system. It is recognised at this stage that you are now of a disposition and capability where you handle the research and writing yourself. Tutorials are there for guidance and direction at a stage where progress is almost exclusively determined through self-initiated work and practice. You are also encouraged to attend and contribute to the professional speakers programme.  

Learning outcomes 

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to achieve the following learning outcomes: Unit 10 Learning Outcomes  Marking criteria 
1. demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of historical, contextual and contemporary debates and contexts that inform graphic design practice. AnalysisSubject Knowledge
2. carry out sustained, systematic and extensive critical research, using relevant resources, analysing and interpreting findings, and applying them to new contexts and to your concerns as a designer. ResearchExperimentation
3. effective communication and presentation skills to construct coherent arguments using appropriate terminology and academic writing conventions, including accurate referencing. Communication and Presentation

UAL Marking Criteria 

Your work in this unit will be assessed against University of the Arts marking criteria, which are designed to give you clear feedback on your achievement. The table above indicates how they relate to the unit learning outcomes.

The full marking criteria descriptions for Learning Outcomes and UAL standard student feedback form for assessment can be found under Section 7, Assessment.

Assessment Evidence 

6000 – 8000 word dissertation with full academic referencing and bibliography. The dissertation will count towards 75% of the mark for this unit.

A Project Blog. The blog will count towards 25% of the mark for this unit.

The Project Blog is a vehicle that allows you to underline and contextualise, through both visual language and text, your progress towards the Final Major Project and your engagement with contemporary design practice.

You should acknowledge anyone else‟s ideas that you use in your dissertation by quoting the source of information. All references must be properly acknowledged using Harvard conventions. Guidance on Harvard referencing can be found at: http://bit.ly/12eP1Wt

Overall, this unit will count towards 33.3% of your final mark.

Recommended Texts and Resources 

At this stage on the course texts and resources should be sourced independently as part of the assessment for this unit.

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Mapping The Territory

HAND IN DATE: Wednesday 15 May 2013 by 12.05pm.

You will hand in a hard copy to the Student Office in E-Block AND email me a single PDF file to:

m.ingham@arts.ac.uk

 For your written text this term you will be asked to produce a literature/practice review on a topic/subject/interest of your choice. You will choose a subject that you have an interest in and/or might possibly be the start of your research for your dissertation. Good quality research is always based on the quality and analysis of the texts and practices that illuminate and deepen any thinking about any chosen subject.

You have a number of options in the way you choose your topic/subject:

Option 1: Revisit the work you did in your first and are doing second terms of your second year. So this could be about documentary films and/or the making of these types of films, based on your work for Consume Peckham. You might take some of the ideas you learnt about in your ToP Elective and continue with that research. You may have found your person and their ideas in the Biographies project very stimulating and want to deepen the research you have already done for this. You may have come across some intriguing ideas in the Collections project and you may continue with this research. You may have found one of the texts like the “Uncanny” discussed in Contextual Studies, thought provoking and want to find out more about the ideas they generated. You may already have some useful research from the Performance you did in the first term and would like to continue this research further in this review.

Option 2: Take an aspect of your Communication Design Practice that you are curious about and take a closer look at the ideas and histories behind it. It could be something you do not quite understand but you think is important to you as a designer.

Option 3: Take a subject that you have been fascinated by but never had the chance to delve more deeply into until now. You may be a fan of a type of work or person and have always wanted to know more. This is the opportunity to go beyond what you already know.

You will have one week to decide on the area you wish to explore and to then find a question or questions that helps you focus your research. Often this might be called the Lead Question and is vital when you are starting any piece of investigative research. Go from the descriptive, What? questions to the more complex and more rewarding How? and Why? ones. You will present your question on the 27.02.2013 to the rest of the group.

A literature/practice review is a piece of discursive prose, not a list describing or summarising one piece of literature or design/art work after another. It is usually a bad sign to see every paragraph beginning with the name of a researcher. Instead, organise the literature review into sections that present themes or identify trends, including relevant theory. You are not trying to list all the material published, but to synthesise and evaluate it according to the guiding concept of your research question. Besides enlarging your knowledge about the topic, writing a literature/practice review lets you gain and demonstrate skills in these areas:

Information seeking: the ability to scan the literature/practice efficiently, using manual or computerised methods, to identify a set of useful website, articles and books.

Critical appraisal: the ability to apply principles of analysis to identify unbiased and valid studies.

Constructing a bibliography: your depth of knowledge about your subject will be reflected by the amount of quality research that can be found in your bibliography.

Your written text will be constructed along these lines:

1. A Title. As Helen Sword (2012) in her book Stylish Academic Writing argues: “The titles of academic articles are typically abstract, technical, and utterly uninviting, such as:

“Social-Organizational Characteristics of Work and Publication Productivity among Academic Scientists in Doctoral-Granting Departments” To send a more welcoming signal to potential readers, try phrasing your title as a question (“Why Are Some Scientists More Productive Than Others?”), a provocative statement (“Productivity Hurts”), a metaphor (“Productivity: Holy Grail or Poisoned Chalice?”) or other memorable phrase (“The Productivity Paradox”). Wherever possible, opt for simple, concrete language. “Snakes on a Plane” is an inviting title; “Aggressive Serpentine Behaviour in a Restrictive Aviation Environment” is not.”

2. An introduction: This should tell the reader Why you have chosen your particular subject. Tell us what motivated you personally to research into this topic. Then tell the reader What the topic is and give a broad outline of what it consists of and the parameters you have set for yourself. Then say How you have gone about this research. What were your analytical methods when reading? How did you decide on what texts to read and what practices to investigate? The say How your have ordered your main body of text.

3. The main literature/practice review: You will start by giving a general introduction to the sources you have found in your research. This is often called the Broader Survey. First briefly explain the broad issues related to your investigation and you do not need to write much about this, just demonstrate that you are aware of the breadth of your subject. Then give an overview of the key texts/designs/art works that you have found the most useful to your thinking about your topic. Then chose two or three of these to go into more detail about and critically appraise and evaluate them in terms of your lead question. Tell us what have they given you and why have they been useful to you.

4. A conclusion: Your conclusion is your chance to have the last word on the subject. The conclusion allows you to have the final say on the issues you have raised in your review, to summarise your thoughts, to demonstrate the importance of your ideas, and to propel your reader to a new view of the subject. It is also your opportunity to make a good final impression and to end on a positive note.

5. An Annotated Bibliography: When you write your annotated bibliography, you will summarise each source of information briefly and describe, analyse/evaluate and situate it in its historical/social/design contexts. This bibliography will have FULL references for each source of information that you have used or looked at during your research. You MUST not just include an URL for on-line sources, there should be an author, date, title, site, URL, when access information included. Include a list of illustrations, which will have the same type of information as in your bibliography.

If in doubt look at: Guide to the Harvard System of Referencing found at:  http://bit.ly/12eP1Wt

You will be graded using the Undergraduate Marking Criteria Matrix:     http://bit.ly/Z9L58o

It will be no longer than 3000 words and where appropriate you should include illustrations.

 HAND IN DATE: Wednesday 15 May 2013 by 12.05pm.

You will hand in a hard copy to the Student Office in E-Block AND email me a single PDF file to:

m.ingham@arts.ac.uk

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Strategies for Writing a Conclusion

(from: http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/acadwrite/conclude.html)

Conclusions are often the most difficult part of a disseatation to write, and many writers feel that they have nothing left to say after having written the disseration. A writer needs to keep in mind that the conclusion is often what a reader remembers best. Your conclusion should be the best part of your paper.


A conclusion should

  • · stress the importance of the thesis statement/lead question
  • · give the disseration a sense of completeness, and
  • · leave a final impression on the reader.

Suggestions

  • · Answer the question “So What?”

Show your readers why this research was important. Show them that your dissertation was meaningful and useful.

  • · Synthesise, don’t summarise
    • Don’t simply repeat things that were in your dissertation  They have read it. Show them how the points you made and the support and examples you used were not random, but fit together.
  • · Redirect your readers
    • Give your reader something to think about, perhaps a way to use your paper in the “real” world. If your introduction went from general to specific, make your conclusion go from specific to general. Think globally.
  • · Create a new meaning
    • o You don’t have to give new information to create a new meaning. By demonstrating how your ideas work together, you can create a new picture. Often the sum of the dissertation is worth more than its parts.

Strategies

  • · Echoing the introduction: Echoing your introduction can be a good strategy if it is meant to bring the reader full-circle. If you begin by describing a scenario, you can end with the same scenario as proof that your dissertation was helpful in creating a new understanding.

Example

Introduction

From the parking lot, I could see the towers of the castle of the Magic Kingdom standing stately against the blue sky. To the right, the tall peak of The Matterhorn rose even higher. From the left, I could hear the jungle sounds of Adventureland. As I entered the gate, Main Street stretched before me with its quaint shops evoking an old-fashioned small town so charming it could never have existed. I was entranced. Disneyland may have been built for children, but it brings out the child in adults.

Conclusion

I thought I would spend a few hours at Disneyland, but here I was at 1:00 A.M., closing time, leaving the front gates with the now dark towers of the Magic Kingdom behind me. I could see tired children, toddling along and struggling to keep their eyes open as best they could. Others slept in their parents’ arms as we waited for the parking lot tram that would take us to our cars. My forty-year-old feet ached, and I felt a bit sad to think that in a couple of days I would be leaving California, my vacation over, to go back to my desk. But then I smiled to think that for at least a day I felt ten years old again.


  • · Challenging the reader: By issuing a challenge to your readers, you are helping them to redirect the information in the dissertation, and they may apply it to their own lives.

Example

Though serving on a jury is not only a civic responsibility but also an interesting experience, many people still view jury duty as a chore that interrupts their jobs and the routine of their daily lives. However, juries are part of America’s attempt to be a free and just society. Thus, jury duty challenges us to be interested and responsible citizens.


  • · Looking to the future: Looking to the future can emphasise the importance of your dissertation or redirect the readers’ thought process. It may help them apply the new information to their lives or see things more globally.

Example

Without well-qualified teachers, schools are little more than buildings and equipment. If higher-paying careers continue to attract the best and the brightest students, there will not only be a shortage of teachers, but the teachers available may not have the best qualifications. Our youth will suffer. And when youth suffers, the future suffers.


  • · Posing questions: Posing questions, either to your readers or in general, may help your readers gain a new perspective on the topic, which they may not have held before reading your conclusion. It may also bring your main ideas together to create a new meaning.

Example

Campaign advertisements should help us understand the candidate’s qualifications and positions on the issues. Instead, most tell us what a boob or knave the opposing candidate is, or they present general images of the candidate as a family person or God-fearing American. Do such advertisements contribute to creating an informed electorate or a people who choose political leaders the same way they choose soft drinks and soap?

All the best

Mark

 

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READING AND REMEMBERING

From: http://www.canberra.edu.au/studyskills/learning/reading

Summary of this page

The problem
How to read academic texts
A word on speed reading
How to remember what you’ve read

How do you manage to get through your reading, and retain what you have read?

Always remember:


academic material is not meant to be read.
It is meant to be ransacked and pillaged for essential content.

Be selective.
Set a realistic time frame for any reading task.

Never read without specific questions you want the text to answer.
Never start reading at page 1 of the text, but look for the summary, conclusion, subheadings, etc.
Read only as much as you need to get the information you are after.
Always keep in mind what you need, what is relevant to the question you are asking the text.
How do you remember what you have read?

One of the basic principles of memory is that the quality of memory is related to the quality of your interaction with what you are trying to remember. If you have organised, dissected, questioned, reviewed and assessed the material you are reading, it will sit more firmly in your memory.

Consider this: why is it so easy to remember the contents of an article about something you are really interested in? It is because you get involved personally in the events and images the text portrays. You can harness some of the same memory potential in academic reading by adopting a particular kind of involved ‘active reading’.

Learn to use your own cognitive strengths—visual, oral-aural, systematic, etc.—to create memorability in your reading. Imagine, visualise, recite, act out your academic material, get it out of the dry text-on-page (or screen) context and put some real life into it.

A final hint—don’t take notes whilst you are reading. Instead, try dividing your reading into shortish sections, closing the book when you have read a section, and writing a summary from memory. The things you recall are strengthened in memory by the act of recall, and the correction of things you leave out or get wrong helps fix them in memory as well.

There is another bonus: you will find that by reading in anticipation of writing a summary, your reading improves by becoming more analytical and conscious of ‘key points’. Try it and see.

The Academic Skills Centre runs workshops during semester which will help you develop your reading and memory techniques.

THE PROBLEM

What is your first reaction when you look at the reading lists for your subjects? Is it something like: ‘How on earth am I going to get through all that?’

When you add up the pages of books, chapters, articles, etc., it comes to a raw total which would be difficult to just get through, let alone remember, organise, and synthesise.

And of course, there are always problems such as material being unavailable—the article the lecturer says is vital for everyone to read, but there is only one copy of the publication in the library, and it has gone missing…

SO—how do you manage to get through your reading, and retain what you have read?

HOW TO READ ACADEMIC TEXTS
A first principle you might consider is:

Academic material is not meant to be read.
It is meant to be ransacked and pillaged for essential content.

This means that you should never just sit down to read academic works as if they were novels or Reader’s Digest articles. Academic study is not suited to such an approach, and the chances are you could spend hours reading and then not have a clue what you have been reading about (does that sound familiar?). Instead, think about the following:

Don’t feel that you must read everything on the reading list.
Use the reading list as a guideline—material on the list will often cover much the same ground, a list may sometimes have alternative items to cover different interests or library limitations, and some of the items on the list will be ‘optional’ to the extent that you can pass the subject without reading them.
Be selective.
Check through the items on your reading list.
Which are basic texts, and which are more detailed? (Will you need basic information or more specific information for your assignment?)
Which are the most accessible to you? (Texts which are crystal clear to one person may be incomprehensible to another, and vice versa—this is not a matter of ‘intelligence’, but of a preference for a particular presentation and style)
Which are reasonably available? (It is no good pinning your hopes on a book if there is one copy in the library and 300 students wanting it.)
Set a realistic time frame for any reading task.
Do not read any longer than you can concentrate. It doesn’t matter if your attention span is short—just set your tasks accordingly.
Never read without specific questions you want the text to answer.
If you want your reading to stay in your memory, you must approach your text with a list of questions about the particular information you are after, and search the text for the answers to those questions.
Don’t just read with the hope that an answer will appear.
Never start reading at page 1 of the text.
If there is a summary, a conclusion, a set of sub-headings, or an abstract, read that first, because it will give you a map of what the text contains. You can then deal with the text structurally, looking for particular points, not just reading ‘blind’ and so easily getting lost.
Read only as much as you need to get the information you are after.
For example, if a piece of information you need is in the abstract of an article, why read the whole article unless you have time to spare?
If a point is clear from reading a summary, is there any benefit in reading through the complete text of a chapter?
If you are interested in the overall findings of a study, do you really need to read the methodology and results sections?
Always keep in mind what you need, what is relevant to the question you are asking the text.
There are many ‘tricks of the trade’ you will either learn or discover for yourself.
For example, rather than reading all of a series of articles on a topic, consider whether the literature review in the last article of the series will give you enough to go on with. You can be infinitely creative with your time- and labour-saving strategies. Look for new ways, and talk with other students about how they manage.
Don’t panic if you cannot get hold of a particular text.
Information may be found in various places, and Canberra is better-supplied with libraries than most other places in the country. Think about looking further afield and being creative in your information searches.
A WORD ON ‘SPEED READING’
From time to time outside companies advertise ‘speed reading’ courses for university students. Some of them are quite expensive, and the level of satisfaction among students is not very high. Speed reading has its uses, but it is certainly not the answer to all the reading needs of university students. Getting through text is only a small part of the reading/remembering task. It doesn’t really matter how much stuff you get through—if it doesn’t get into your understanding, it is useless.

REMEMBERING WHAT YOU’VE READ
If you follow the points above, you will find that you take in a lot more than you would if you just dived into the text. One of the basic principles of memory is that the quality of memory is related to the quality of your interaction with what you are trying to remember. Obviously, if you have organised, dissected, questioned, reviewed and assessed the material you are reading, it will sit more firmly in your memory, and be more accessible.

There are many ‘memory systems’ available, some current and commercially promoted, some of great antiquity (the ancient Romans, for example, had some interesting systems). If you want to have a look at some of these, fine—they work for some people. However, if you are looking at something which is going to cost you hard-earned cash, think carefully! There are a lot of folk around after an easy dollar …..

You might like to consider this: why is it so easy to remember the contents of an article about something you are really interested in, or the even more complex contents of a good novel? The answers might have something to do with interest, not having to read them, etc., but it also has a great deal to do with the sort of interaction the reader has with such material. For example, when you read a novel or story you are not just dealing with text—you are getting involved personally in the events and images the text portrays. You feel sad or happy or outraged at what happens, and you probably see the events and scenes described as clearly as if you were seeing it all on film.

The link between recreational reading and a heavy academic text may not be obvious. You may feel like crying over a book on economics or neurophysiology, but the reasons will be very different to those with a good novel! However, you can harness some of the same memory potential in academic reading by adopting a particular kind of ‘active reading’.

For example, try envisaging yourself as a professional in the field you are studying, actually using the stuff you are reading to give advice or solve problems. Getting involved with the knowledge you are trying to absorb, making it personal, greatly enhances its memorability (some time ago we had a group of law students enacting

Rumpole or The Practice scenarios with the cases they had to study, and apart from being highly amusing, it made the material much easier to come to grips with).

Learn to use your own cognitive strengths—visual, oral-aural, systematic, etc.—to create memorability in your reading. Imagine, visualise, recite, act out your academic material, get it out of the dry text-on-page (or screen) context and put some real life into it. Even just applying your growing knowledge to the day’s news headlines can be enormously helpful, and so can telling people about the understanding you are developing about issues that come up in conversation.

Importantly, don’t try to memorise everything! You don’t have to be a parrot or a recording machine. Make sure you understand the main points of what you are reading.

The Academic Skills Centre runs workshops during semester which will help you develop your reading and memory techniques, and we can help you on a one-to-one basis by appointment. We can cover much more than this brief article contains, so get in touch with the ASP!

A final hint—when you are reading, particularly for revision, think about not taking notes.

It is easy to fall into a note-taking mode that is almost mechanical transcription, and little of what you are writing gets into memory. Instead, try dividing your reading into shortish sections, closing the book when you have read a section, and writing a summary from memory. The things you recall are strengthened in memory by the act of recall, and the correction of things you leave out or get wrong helps fix them in memory as well.

There is another bonus: you will find that by reading in anticipation of writing a summary, your reading improves by becoming more analytical and conscious of ‘key points’. Try it and see.

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Mapping The Territory

 For your written text this term you will be asked to produce a literature/practice review on a topic/subject/interest of your choice. You will choose a subject that you have an interest in and/or might possibly be the start of your research for your dissertation. Good quality research is always based on the quality and analysis of the texts and practices that illuminate and deepen any thinking about any chosen subject.

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You have a number of options in the way you choose your topic/subject:

Option 1: Revisit the work you did in your first and are doing second terms of your second year. So this could be about documentary films and/or the making of these types of films, based on your work for Consume Peckham. You might take some of the ideas you learnt about in your ToP Elective and continue with that research. You may have found your person and their ideas in the Biographies project very stimulating and want to deepen the research you have already done for this. You may have come across some intriguing ideas in the Collections project and you may continue with this research. You may have found one of the texts like the “Uncanny” discussed in Contextual Studies, thought provoking and want to find out more about the ideas they generated. You may already have some useful research from the Performance you did in the first term and would like to continue this research further in this review.

Option 2: Take an aspect of your Communication Design Practice that you are curious about and take a closer look at the ideas and histories behind it. It could be something you do not quite understand but you think is important to you as a designer.

Option 3: Take a subject that you have been fascinated by but never had the chance to delve more deeply into until now. You may be a fan of a type of work or person and have always wanted to know more. This is the opportunity to go beyond what you already know.

You will have one week to decide on the area you wish to explore and to then find a question or questions that helps you focus your research. Often this might be called the Lead Question and is vital when you are starting any piece of investigative research. Go from the descriptive, What? questions to the more complex and more rewarding How? and Why? ones. You will present your question on the 27.02.2013 to the rest of the group.

A literature/practice review is a piece of discursive prose, not a list describing or summarising one piece of literature or design/art work after another. It is usually a bad sign to see every paragraph beginning with the name of a researcher. Instead, organise the literature review into sections that present themes or identify trends, including relevant theory. You are not trying to list all the material published, but to synthesise and evaluate it according to the guiding concept of your research question. Besides enlarging your knowledge about the topic, writing a literature/practice review lets you gain and demonstrate skills in these areas:

Information seeking: the ability to scan the literature/practice efficiently, using manual or computerized methods, to identify a set of useful website, articles and books.

Critical appraisal: the ability to apply principles of analysis to identify unbiased and valid studies.

Constructing a bibliography: your depth of knowledge about your subject will be reflected by the amount of quality research that can be found in your bibliography.

 Your written text will be constructed along these lines:

1. A Title. As Helen Sword (2012) in her book Stylish Academic Writing argues: “The titles of academic articles are typically abstract, technical, and utterly uninviting, such as: “Social-Organisational Characteristics of Work and Publication Productivity among Academic Scientists in Doctoral-Granting Departments” To send a more welcoming signal to potential readers, try phrasing your title as a question (“Why Are Some Scientists More Productive Than Others?”), a provocative statement (“Productivity Hurts”), a metaphor (“Productivity: Holy Grail or Poisoned Chalice?”) or other memorable phrase (“The Productivity Paradox”). Wherever possible, opt for simple, concrete language. “Snakes on a Plane” is an inviting title; “Aggressive Serpentine Behaviour in a Restrictive Aviation Environment” is not.”

2. An introduction: This should tell the reader Why you have chosen your particular subject. Tell us what motivated you personally to research into this topic. Then tell the reader What the topic is and give a broad outline of what it consists of and the parameters you have set for yourself. Then say How you have gone about this research. What were your analytical methods when reading? How did you decide on what texts to read and what practices to investigate? The say How your have ordered your main body of text.

3. The main literature/practice review: You will start by giving a general introduction to the sources you have found in your research. This is often called the Broader Survey. First briefly explain the broad issues related to your investigation and you do not need to write much about this, just demonstrate that you are aware of the breadth of your subject. Then give an overview of the key texts/designs/art works that you have found the most useful to your thinking about your topic. Then chose two or three of these to go into more detail about and critically appraise and evaluate them in terms of your lead question. Tell us what have they given you and why have they been useful to you.

4. A conclusion: Your conclusion is your chance to have the last word on the subject. The conclusion allows you to have the final say on the issues you have raised in your review, to summarise your thoughts, to demonstrate the importance of your ideas, and to propel your reader to a new view of the subject. It is also your opportunity to make a good final impression and to end on a positive note.

5. An Annotated Bibliography: When you write your annotated bibliography, you will summarise each source of information briefly and describe, analyse/evaluate and situate it in its historical/social/design contexts. This bibliography will have FULL references for each source of information that you have used or looked at during your research. You MUST not just include an URL for on-line sources, there should be an author, date, title, site, URL, when access information included. Include a list of illustrations, which will have the same type of information as in your bibliography.

If in doubt look at: Guide to the Harvard System of Referencing found at:  http://bit.ly/12eP1Wt

You will be graded using the Undergraduate Marking Criteria Matrix:     http://bit.ly/Z9L58o

It will be no longer than 3000 words and where appropriate you should include illustrations.

HAND IN DATE: Wednesday 15 May 2013 by 4pm.

 You will hand in a hard copy to the Student Office in E-Block AND email me a single PDF file to: m.ingham@arts.ac.uk

Here is a Sample Text from a literature review:

In 1984, Jenny Cushman, in her perceptive article, ‘The Chinese community in Australian historiography’ made a passionate plea for historians to move away from studies of Australian attitudes to “relocate the Chinese experience within the Chinese community itself”. She further urged researchers to investigate the way Chinese customs, legal notions and kinship relations were adapted to the Australian physical and social environment. It is tempting to credit many of the succeeding changes to Cushman’s appeal. However, the new approaches must be viewed within the context of the changing tide of historiography and the impact of ‘multiculturalism’.

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http://www.slideshare.net/markingham/subjectlliterature-review

PowerPoint of  subjectliterature-review.

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PDF of Brief: Mapping The Territory Brief

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Gentletude International Typography Awards

06Dec

…big news just in for Graphic Design Communication and Chelsea. The Gentletude Design Award is an international award for typhographic design students, both undergraduate and graduates within 4 years of graduation), who study or studied in England, Italy, Switzerland, USA, Singapore, Argentina, or Japan. In November we submitted 18 entries and achieved 10 finalists of 14. We now have the results from the jury in Italy and our students have been awarded first, second and third prizes!

The Award is organised by the NGO Gentletude, a not-for-profit organisation founded by Cristina Milani. The award aims is to encourage a new generation of designers to be creative at an international level and to encourage a broader community of practice.

Our students implemented the the alphabet to create a message elaborating the term ‘gentletude’ and including the words ‘Kindness’ and ‘Attitude’. A key criteria required messages to be shared by smartphone, so it was important to consider technological constraints when creating work. The idea was that the recipient of the message will reflect on kindness as an option for a better life.

Please see:

http://www.facebook.com/gentletude?fref=ts
First prize is 1,000 Euro and second 500 Euro. There will now be extensive home and international press coverage. The first prize winner is Joe Hayes.

Keep an eye on the Graphic Design Communication blog –http://brighterchelsea.com/

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